Global Warming Has Little Correlation with Levels of Carbon Dioxide

The authors of the commentary quoted below are Harrison H. Schmitt and William Happer. Schmitt has at various times been a U.S. Senator, an Apollo 17 astronaut, and an adjunct professor of engineering at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Happer is a professor of physics at Princeton University, and previously served as the Director at the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Research.

(p. A19) Of all of the world’s chemical compounds, none has a worse reputation than carbon dioxide. Thanks to the single-minded demonization of this natural and essential atmospheric gas by advocates of government control of energy production, the conventional wisdom about carbon dioxide is that it is a dangerous pollutant. That’s simply not the case. Contrary to what some would have us believe, increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will benefit the increasing population on the planet by increasing agricultural productivity.

The cessation of observed global warming for the past decade or so has shown how exaggerated NASA’s and most other computer predictions of human-caused warming have been–and how little correlation warming has with concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide. As many scientists have pointed out, variations in global temperature correlate much better with solar activity and with complicated cycles of the oceans and atmosphere. There isn’t the slightest evidence that more carbon dioxide has caused more extreme weather.
. . .
We know that carbon dioxide has been a much larger fraction of the earth’s atmosphere than it is today, and the geological record shows that life flourished on land and in the oceans during those times. The incredible list of supposed horrors that increasing carbon dioxide will bring the world is pure belief disguised as science.

For the full commentary, see:
Harrison H. Schmitt and William Happer. “OPINION; In Defense of Carbon Dioxide; The demonized chemical compound is a boon to plant life and has little correlation with global temperature.” The Wall Street Journal (Thurs., May 9, 2013): A19.
(Note: ellipsis added.)
(Note: the online version of the commentary has the date May 8, 2013, and has the title “OPINION; Harrison H. Schmitt and William Happer: In Defense of Carbon Dioxide; The demonized chemical compound is a boon to plant life and has little correlation with global temperature.” )

The lack of correlation between carbon dioxide and global temperature is rigorously supported in:
McMillan, David G., and Mark E. Wohar. “The Relationship between Temperature and CO2 Emissions: Evidence from a Short and Very Long Dataset.” Applied Economics 45, no. 26 (2013): 3683-90.

Free Agent Entrepreneur Mr. C Exuded a Zest for Life

CanigliaYanoMisterC2013-11-27.jpg “In a 2000 photo, Sebastiano “Yano” Caniglia, a member of one of Omaha’s largest restaurant families, stands outside his Mister C’s Steakhouse, which operated from 1953 until 2007.” Source of caption and photo: online version of the Omaha World-Herald obituary quoted and cited below.

In the current draft of my book Openness to Creative Destruction, I use Mr. C as my example of a “free agent entrepreneur.” An evening at Mr. C’s was as much about spirit and experience and entertainment as it was about food. Mr. C’s was on the other side of town, but we tried to get there at least once a year, usually around the holidays. When my daughter was young, she would run over to the wonderful diorama that included Frank Sinatra, Mr. C, and the Pope. I remember the strolling violinist, the accordion player and the clown. And the time Mr. C stopped by our table to show us his singing potted flower. This time of year, I remember the thousands of small twinkling Christmas lights throughout the restaurant. Mr. C exuded a wonderful childlike enthusiasm and zest for life.

(p. 1B) “He was only at Hospice House for a few hours,” said his son. “He was singing to the nurses, telling them stories and ­having a wonderful day when he dropped.”
. . .
(p. 2B) David Caniglia said his father had a simple business model that included “good, old-fashioned hard work.”
“He was sincere when people came into the restaurant. They were more than just customers, they were coming into his home,” he said.
On the last day for Mister C’s, Yano Caniglia told The World-Herald: “I couldn’t wait to get to work every day. I never wanted it to end.”
A reporter in 1983 described Mr. C in his restaurant:
“If it was your first visit, you probably were still recovering from the dazzle of thousands of Christmas lights that festoon the place when he bustled up to your table, welcomed you in his booming voice and, if there were kids in your party, deftly twisted balloon animals for them.”

For the full obituary, see:
Sue Story Truax. “Man Behind Mister C’s Success, Sebastiano Caniglia, Dies at 89.” Omaha World-Herald (Friday, November 15, 2013): 1B-2B.
(Note: ellipsis added.)
(Note: the online version of the obituary has the date Thursday, November 14, 2013, and has the title “Yano Caniglia was the mister in Mr. C’s Steakhouse.”)

“Carnegie Watched, Listened, Learned” from Scott’s Process Innovations

(p. 65) Later in life, Scott would be better known for his political skills, but he was, like his mentor Thomson, a master of cost accounting. Together, the two men steadily cut unit costs and increased revenues by investing in capital improvements–new and larger locomotives, better braking systems, improved tracks, new bridges. Instead of running several smaller trains along the same route, they ran fewer but longer trains with larger locomotives and freight cars. To minimize delays–a major factor in escalating costs–they erected their own telegraph lines, built a second track and extended sidings alongside the first one, and kept roadways, tunnels, bridges, and crossings in good repair.
Carnegie watched, listened, learned. Nothing was lost on the young man. With an exceptional memory and a head for figures, he made the most of his apprenticeship and within a brief time was acting more as Scott’s deputy than his assistant. Tom Scott had proven to be so good at his job that when Pennsylvania Railroad vice president William Foster died unexpectedly of an infected carbuncle, Scott was named his successor.

Source:
Nasaw, David. Andrew Carnegie. New York: Penguin Press, 2006.
(Note: the pagination of the hardback and paperback editions of Nasaw’s book are the same.)