Serendipitous Discovery of CorningWare

(p. A15) S. Donald Stookey, a scientist with Corning Glass Works who in the 1950s accidentally discovered a remarkably strong material that could be used not just to make the nose cone of a missile but also to contain a casserole in both a refrigerator and hot oven — its durable culinary incarnation was called CorningWare — died on Tuesday [November 4, 2014] in Rochester.
. . .
Dr. Stookey had not planned to invent it. Experimenting at Corning one day in 1953, he put photosensitive glass into a furnace, intending to heat it to 600 degrees.
“When I came back, the temperature gauge was stuck on 900 degrees, and I thought I had ruined the furnace,” he said in an interview several years ago. “When I opened the door to the furnace, I saw the glass was intact and had turned a milky white. I grabbed some tongs to get it out as fast as I could, but the glass slipped out of the tongs and fell to the floor. The thing bounced and didn’t break. It sounded like steel hitting the floor.”

For the full obituary, see:
WILLIAM YARDLEY. “S. Donald Stookey, Scientist, Dies at 99; Among His Inventions Was CorningWare.” The New York Times (Sat., NOV. 8, 2014): A15.
(Note: ellipsis, and bracketed date, added.)
(Note: the online version of the obituary has the date NOV. 6, 2014.)

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