Workers May Prefer to Have More Workcations than Fewer Vacations

(p. B6) . . . for various reasons, people might choose or need to work from remote destinations, and logging in from the beach may be more relaxing than clocking into the office.
Adds Kenneth Matos, senior director of research at the Families and Work Institute: “Is the workcation detracting from the vacation you were going to have, or is it enabling the vacation you otherwise wouldn’t have had?”
. . .
For Bill Raymond, Disney World proved an ideal workcation destination. In February, Mr. Raymond and his wife flew from their suburban Boston home to Orlando, where they spent a couple of days touring the theme park.
For the next two days, Mr. Raymond, a solutions architect at enterprise search firm Voyager Search, clocked full workdays from the Orlando resort, hunkering down with his laptop and taking sales calls by the pool.
Mr. Raymond even wrote a post on his personal blog with tips on how to be a productive “workcationer” at Disney, pinpointing locations at the resort that offer fewer distractions. (Among his top picks were the pool at the Disney Port Orleans French Quarter resort, which he says wasn’t “overrun with kids being kids.”)
Brian Goldin, Voyager’s chief executive and Mr. Raymond’s boss, was “totally fine” with the arrangement. “The idea of the traditional office environment doesn’t really exist that much,” Mr. Goldin says.
. . .
The working vacation kept Ms. Granzella Larssen, 32 years old, current with her email; she also felt more productive in a tropical setting because she wasn’t being pulled into impromptu meetings. And despite being by the beach, “I felt completely plugged in.”

For the full commentary, see:
RACHEL EMMA SILVERMAN. “This Summer, How About a Workcation?” The Wall Street Journal (Weds., June 24, 2015): B1 & B6.
(Note: ellipses added.)
(Note: the online version of the commentary has the date June 23, 2015, has the title “This Summer, How About a Workcation?”)

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