Health Care Mandate “Freezes You at a Time When You Need to Be Moving Fast”

(p. B4) When LaRonda Hunter opened a Fantastic Sams hair salon 10 years ago in Saginaw, Tex., a suburb of Fort Worth, she envisioned it as the first of what would eventually be a small regional collection of salons. As her sales grew, so did her business, which now encompasses four locations — but her plans for a fifth salon are frozen, perhaps permanently.

Starting in January, the Affordable Care Act requires businesses with 50 or more full-time-equivalent employees to offer workers health insurance or face penalties that can exceed $2,000 per employee. Ms. Hunter, who has 45 employees, is determined not to cross that threshold. Paying for health insurance would wipe out her company’s profit and the five-figure salary she pays herself from it, she said.
“The margins are not big enough within our industry to support it,” she said. “It’s not that I don’t want to — I love my employees, and I want to do everything I can for them — but the numbers just don’t work.”
. . .
For some business owners on the edge of the cutoff, the mandate is forcing them to weigh very carefully the price of growing bigger.
“There’s kind of a deer-in-headlights moment for those who say, ‘I have this new potential client, but if I bring them on, I have to hire five additional people,'” said Philip P. Noftsinger, the payroll unit president at CBIZ, a financial services provider for businesses. “They’re really trying to assess how much the 50th employee is going to cost.”
. . .
For businesses that use many seasonal, variable-hour or temporary workers, like those in the hospitality industry, simply figuring out how many qualifying employees they have can be a challenge.
“I think companies are going to have to work with their payroll processor for the basic data, and then their accountant or attorney about what certain items mean,” Mr. Prince said.
The expense and distraction of all that paperwork is one of the biggest frustrations for one business owner, Joseph P. Sergio. His industrial cleaning company, Polar Clean, which is based in South Bend, Ind., but dispatches teams nationally, has just under 50 core employees. One of its business lines is disaster restoration, and after a flood or hurricane, its temporary staff balloons.
Mr. Sergio offers health insurance to his permanent staff, but the premiums have risen so quickly that he had to switch to a more restrictive plan, with a higher deductible. He is reluctant to go over the 50-employee line and incur all of the new rules that come with it. That makes bidding for new jobs an arduous and risky exercise.
“I’ve had to pull my controller and a couple of top people to sit and spend days going through this,” he said. “If you ramp up, and it pushes you over 50, there’s all these unknown costs and complicated rules. Are we really going to be able to benefit from going after that opportunity? It freezes you at a time when you need to be moving fast.”

For the full story, see:
STACY COWLEY. “ENTREPRENEURSHIP; Health Care Law Leads Business Owners to Rethink Plans for Growth.” The New York Times (Thurs., NOV. 19, 2015): B4.
(Note: ellipses added.)
(Note: the online version of the story has the date NOV. 18, 2015, and has the title “ENTREPRENEURSHIP; Health Care Law Forces Businesses to Consider Growth’s Costs.”)

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