Only 5% of Gender Pay Differential Is Likely Due to Discrimination

(p. A17) Full-time employment is technically defined as more than 35 hours. This raises an obvious problem: A simple side-by-side comparison of all men and all women includes people who work 35 hours a week, and others who work 45. Men are significantly more likely than women to work longer hours, according to the BLS. And if we compare only people who work 40 hours a week, BLS data show that women then earn on average 90 cents for every dollar earned by men.
Career choice is another factor. Research in 2013 by Anthony Carnevale, a Georgetown University economist, shows that women flock to college majors that lead to lower-paying careers. Of the 10 lowest-paying majors–such as “drama and theater arts” and “counseling psychology”–only one, “theology and religious vocations,” is majority male.
Conversely, of the 10 highest-paying majors–including “mathematics and computer science” and “petroleum engineering”–only one, “pharmacy sciences and administration,” is majority female. Eight of the remaining nine are more than 70% male.
Other factors that account for earnings differences include marriage and children, both of which cause many women to leave the workforce for years. June O’Neill, former director of the Congressional Budget Office, concluded in a 2005 study that “there is no gender gap in wages among men and women with similar family roles.”
. . .
Ms. O’Neill and her husband concluded in their 2012 book, “The Declining Importance of Race and Gender in the Labor Market,” that once all these factors are taken into account, very little of the pay differential between men and women is due to actual discrimination, which is “unlikely to account for a differential of more than 5 percent but may not be present at all.”

For the full commentary, see:
SARAH KETTERER. “The ‘Wage Gap’ Myth That Won’t Die; You have to ignore many variables to think women are paid less than men. California is happy to try.” The Wall Street Journal (Thurs., Oct. 1, 2015): A17.
(Note: ellipsis added.)
(Note: the online version of the commentary was updated on Sept. 30, 2015.)

The O’Neill book mentioned above, is:
O’Neill, June E., and Dave M. O’Neill. The Declining Importance of Race and Gender in the Labor Market: The Role of Employment Discrimination Policies. Washington, D.C.: AEI Press, 2012.

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