Meat Residue on Stone Blades from 250,000 Years Ago

(p. D2) James Pokines, a forensic anthropologist at the Boston University School of Medicine, and his colleagues uncovered several 250,000-year-old blades and hand axes, with bits of rhinoceros, horse and camel on them, in Jordan.
. . .
The findings, which were published in The Journal of Archaeological Science, may be the oldest evidence of protein residue on stone tools.

For the full story, see:
NICHOLAS ST. FLEUR. “Etched in Stone: Early Carving Knives.” The New York Times (Tues., AUG. 23, 2016): D2.
(Note: ellipsis added.)
(Note: the online version of the story has the date AUG. 22, 2016, and has the title Carving the Meat Before Meals, 250,000 Years Ago.”)

The research mentioned above, is elaborated in the academic article:
Nowell, A., C. Walker, C. E. Cordova, C. J. H. Ames, James T. Pokines, D. Stueber, R. DeWitt, and A. S. A. al-Souliman. “Middle Pleistocene Subsistence in the Azraq Oasis, Jordan: Protein Residue and Other Proxies.” Journal of Archaeological Science 73 (Sept. 2016): 36-44.

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