Alzheimer’s Innovator Financed Research with Loan on His House

(p. 29) In the early 1990s, Dr. Roses and his collaborators at Duke University rejected prevailing assumptions that the buildup in the brain of a protein plaque called amyloid directly caused memory loss and other mental impairments in Alzheimer’s patients.
Instead, they maintained that the plaque largely resulted from the disease, and that the deterioration of brain function actually originated from the variation of a single gene.
In 2009, after financing his research with a loan of almost $500,000 on his house, Dr. Roses and his team identified a second gene that they said could help predict whether the cognitive ability of an older person, generally between 65 and 83, would decline within about five years of acquiring Alzheimer’s.
. . .
The heart attack that caused his death was his third since 1990, but his pace never faltered. “He treated every day like it was his last one, because he knew it probably was,” Stephanie Roses said. “He woke up every morning and would blink three times and say, ‘I have another day.'”

For the full obituary, see:
SAM ROBERTS. “Allen Roses, Who Studied Genes’ Role in Alzheimer’s Disease, Is Dead at 73.” The New York Times (Thurs., OCT. 6, 2016): 29.
(Note: ellipsis added.)
(Note: the online version of the obituary has the date OCT. 5, 2016, and has the title “Allen Roses, Who Upset Common Wisdom on Cause of Alzheimer’s, Dies at 73.”)

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