Wages Rise as Fast-Food Jobs Go Unfilled

(p. A10) . . . in an industry where cheap labor is an essential component in providing inexpensive food, a shortage of workers is changing the equation upon which fast-food places have long relied. This can be seen in rising wages, in a growth of incentives, and in the sometimes odd situations that business owners find themselves in.
This is why Jeffrey Kaplow, for example, spends a lot of time working behind the counter in his Subway restaurant in Lower Manhattan. It’s not what he pictured himself doing, but he simply doesn’t have enough employees.
Mr. Kaplow has tried everything he can think of to find workers, placing Craigslist ads, asking other franchisees for referrals, seeking to hire people from Subways that have closed.

For the full story, see:
Rachel Abrams and Robert Gebeloff. “A Fast-Food Problem: Where Have All The Teenagers Gone?” The New York Times (Friday, May 4, 2018): B1 & B5.
(Note: ellipsis added.)
(Note: the online version of the story has the date May 3, 2018.)

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