How to Avoid Bureaucratic Time-Wasting Lines

(p. 9) London — ITALIAN bureaucracy is legendary for a reason. Italians spend so much of their lives waiting in line — an estimated 400 hours a year per person — that some are now willing to pay freelancers to wait on their behalf. The rich can pay a “codista,” a neologism for a trained line sitter, to maunder at the post office or bank while they get on with something more important.
. . .
Brazil has its “despachantes,” meaning dispatchers. Venezuela has its “coleros,” which, oddly, can translate to “top hats”; and Spain its “gestores” or agents. Meanwhile, in South Africa there is a company called Q4U that takes care specifically of the irksome business of applying for a British passport.
In New York City, the cash-rich and time-poor use the service Same Ole Line Dudes, which describes itself as “New York’s only professional line sitting team.” The Dudes will charge you $25 for the first hour, plus $10 for each additional 30 minutes, to put in the necessary time to obtain coveted concert tickets or rare new sneakers. Their slogan is, “We wait for your wants.” I am told that they will even wait at the Department of Motor Vehicles for you.

For the full commentary, see:
TOM HODGKINSON. “How to Get Paid to Do Nothing.” The New York Times, SundayReview Section (Sun., July 10, 2016): 9.
(Note: ellipsis added.)
(Note: the online version of the commentary has the date July 9, 2016.)

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