Inventor of Mason Jar Died Poor, Alone and Forgotten

(p. 74) In 1859 an American named John Landis Mason solved the challenge that the Frenchman Fran├žois (or Nicolas) Appert had not quite mastered the better part of a century before. Mason patented the threaded glass jar with a metal screw-on lid. This provided a perfect seal and made it possible to preserve all kinds of foods that would previously spoil. The Mason jar became a huge hit everywhere, though Mason himself scarcely benefited from it. He sold the rights in it for a modest sum, then turned his attention to other inventions – a folding life raft, a case for keeping cigars fresh, a selfdraining soap dish – that he assumed would make him rich, but his other inventions not only weren’t successful, they weren’t even very good. As one after another failed, Mason withdrew into a semidemented poverty. He died alone and forgotten in a New York City tenement house in 1902.

Source:
Bryson, Bill. At Home: A Short History of Private Life. New York: Doubleday, 2010.

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